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Mexico’s lockdowns fuel rise in drug-trafficking, forced prostitution

A health worker is escorted by soldiers as she arrives to the Sports Center with a cooler containing doses of the Russian COVID-19 vaccine Sputnik V, for a mass vaccination campaign against the new coronavirus for the elderly in the Xochimilco borough of Mexico City, Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

A health worker is escorted by soldiers as she arrives to the Sports Center with a cooler containing doses of the Russian COVID-19 vaccine Sputnik V,  for a mass vaccination campaign against the new coronavirus for the elderly in the Xochimilco borough of Mexico City, Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

A health worker is escorted by soldiers as she arrives to the Sports Center with a cooler containing doses of the Russian COVID-19 vaccine Sputnik V in the Xochimilco borough of Mexico City, Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 8:07 AM PT – Monday, March 1, 2021

Human rights groups have warned thousands of Mexicans are turning to the sex industry due to economic desolation caused by COVID-19 lockdowns.

“Because of hunger and necessity, and not having any savings or income to eat or pay rent, all that pushed me back after 10 years to return to work as a sex worker,” stated an unidentified Mexican national.

According to reports, the Mexican economy has experienced a rise in unemployment and poverty, in turn, forcing thousands of men and women into sex work.

Human rights activists have stressed that economic lockdowns violate people’s right to work and provide for themselves.

“And the new ones, which are the other 40 percent, they would cry because they would say, ‘I don’t want to do this but I must bring food for my children,’” explained Elvira Madrid, director of Brigada Callejera (Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women). “The other 20 percent that shocked us even more were housewives.”

According to economists, coronavirus lockdowns in Mexico gave a boost to illegal businesses such as drugs and human trafficking while legal sources of income were shut down for many citizens.

MORE NEWS: Citizens rally against COVID-19 lockdowns in the Netherlands

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