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Pentagon looks to automate fleet craft

Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin waits to speak during a visit by US President Joe Biden to the Pentagon in Washington, DC, February 10, 2021. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)

Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin waits to speak during a visit by Joe Biden to the Pentagon in Washington, DC, February 10, 2021. (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 2:15 PM PT – Sunday, February 14, 2021

The Pentagon made additional moves to automate military operations through a $740 billion defense bill passed last month. The bill included multiple directives for incorporating autonomous technology in sea and air vessels.

Computer-controlled cockpits of helicopters, tankers and cargo planes would allow for remote controlled missions. One initiative would provide jet fighters with their own autonomous wingman for an advantage in dog fights.

150831-N-WK391-032 PACIFIC OCEAN (August 31,2015) Amphibious assault vehicles prepare to enter the well deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18), during Exercise Dawn Blitz 2015 (DB-15). DB-15, being conducted from Aug. 31- Sept. 9, 2015 by Expeditionary Strike Group 3 (ESG-3) and 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade (1stMEB), is a multinational training exercise between the U.S., Japan, Mexico and New Zealand which conducts live, simulated, and constructive operations to enhance each country’s ability to activate and deploy an Amphibious Task Force with speed and effectiveness in support of the full range of military operations as required by combatant commanders. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Brandon Cyr/Released)

Amphibious assault vehicles prepare to enter the well deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18), during Exercise Dawn Blitz 2015 (DB-15). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Brandon Cyr/Released)

Automation across all branches of the military is gaining steam.

“Rather than the aircrew managing and manipulating all the controls at the same time, the aircraft understands how to keep itself stable,” Marine Corps Aviation Colonel Byron Sullivan said. “So for example, when you’re in a hover in this aircraft, you can basically auto-couple the aircraft to a point in space, laterally and in elevation as well.”

AI systems would allow pilots to focus on flying strategically as opposed to responding to threats, which is a task the military plans to automate.

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